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Oxford England

  • The End of the Road
    These photos are separated from my Travels album because Oxford is something of a second home. I still manage to visit it several times a year. So the pathway between Manotick and Oxford is well trodden and I can likely do it with my eyes closed - and probably have on more than one occasion.

Royal Roads University

  • Hatley Castle
    This series of photographs was taken over the last few years. I have stayed at the campus of Royal Roads on several occasions and I have been repeatedly impressed by the grounds. They are in many ways a little-known treasure.

Travels

  • Kafka Statue
    Here is a selection of pictures I have taken during my travels over the last few years. I am very obviously an amateur photographer and it is not uncommon for me to forget my camera altogether when packing. What the pictures do not convey is the fact that in these travels I have met, and gotten to know, a great many interesting people.

Manotick Ontario

  • Springtime in Manotick
    Manotick Ontario Canada is the part of Ottawa that I call home. Much of Manotick stands on an island in the Rideau River. Interestingly, the Rideau Canal, which runs through and around the river, was recently designated a World Heritage Site by the United Nations. So this means that the view from my backyard is in some way on a similar par with the Egyptian Pyramids - although the thought strikes me as ridiculous.
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« Secrets to Content Management Success | Main

December 28, 2016

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Vingar

Gollner, I like your statement.... "At the most advanced stage, communicators divide their attention between very small units of content, which we came to refer to as "molecules", and the encapsulating content objects that combine these molecules into components and topics.". This is somewhat similar to what Brad Frost has been talking for design as *Atomic Design*: http://atomicdesign.bradfrost.com/table-of-contents/

Sarah O'Keefe shared her experience of tekom 2016 in a post where the discussion points to some useful sources for Industry4.0 and Information4.0, at: http://www.scriptorium.com/2016/11/tekom-2016-gotterdammerung/

I talk about the same model in the language of *Content - Brick by Brick*: https://medium.com/you-too/content-brick-by-brick-40bed73b39d#.9484rae3v

Joe Gollner

Hi Vinish

I have not yet had time to look at the Atomic Design in detail, but it definitely looks interesting / promising. I think that there is a concurrent line of thinking about finer granularity that applies to application and experience design just as I have been sketching out for "content". In fact, in my treatment of content objects - they all do need to come together. This actually takes us back to classical Configuration Management where a central tenet is that you manage functionality as your primary focus and allow different components or services get you what you need. This means that you cannot meaningfully manage content in isolation from how it will be delivered and used. Similarly the design of the experiences that will be enabled cannot be meaningfully completed or managed or realized in isolation of the content that will fill in its branches and leaves. I first tackled this line of thinking in a presentation I gave over 20 years ago!

Sarah's observations are great and they echo my same experiences and observations from Stuttgart. The German marketplace, with the prominence of the machine industry and their evident interest in (and leadership of) Industry 4.0 being hard to miss.

And I do think that the story I sketched out aligns perfectly with your points about "Content - Brick by Brick".

Thanks for your comments and for the reference links. I will continue to explore Atomic Design...

Mike McNamara

Great piece Joe,

Only had a quick read, but will read again in-depth.

Always interesting to read your take on the changing (and challenging) times we live in.

Regards
Mike

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